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How to Find the Percentage of a number (click here) :- The word percentage is derived from the Latin word ‘per-centum’. It means ‘per hundred’, or hundred’ or hundredth’. The symbol which is used to represent the percent is %. E.g. 67 percent is written as 67%, thirteen percent is written as 13% etc. The meaning of this is given below.

Thirteen percent 13 % = 13/100, thirteen divided by one hundred
Sixty seven percent 67% = 67/100, sixty seven divided by one hundred.

Example: - Let us find the thirty three percent (33%) of a number three thousand, three hundred and thirty three (3333). 

Solution: - The given number is three thousand, three hundred and thirty three (3333).

Therefore, thirty three percent of the number three thousand three hundred and thirty three (3333).  = 33/100 X 3333 = 1099.89 (One thousand ninety nine point eight nine)


Example: - Let us find the sixty three percent (63%) of a number ninety three thousand, five hundred and thirty three (93533).


Solution: - The given number is ninety three thousand, five hundred and thirty three (93533). Therefore sixty three percent of the number ninety three thousand, five hundred and thirty three (93533) is.  = 63/100 X 93533 = 58925.79 (fifty eight thousand nine hundred and twenty five point seven nine.)


Example: - Let us find what percentage of forty are sixty. 

Solution: - Let x is the percentage of forty is sixty. There are two numbers. The original number is forty and the second number is sixty. Therefore, 
40. X = 60
Or x = 60/ 40 = 1.5
In percentage this number should be multiplied by the one hundred, therefore 
1.5 X 100 = 150 % 
We can also calculate the percentage of increase and percentage of decrease by the following formula. 
Percentage Increase = (Relative difference of two input values )/(Reference input value)  ×100 
    

Percentage decrease = (Relative difference of two input values )/(Reference input value)  ×

Find the area of a circle (Read More) : -  The area of a circles is the place which is swept by anything.  The area of the circles is the place which is inside the circles. The area depends upon the radius of a circles, the more is the radius, and the more is the area of the circles. The area of the circles can be used to find the volume of the cylinder and cones.

As we know that the area is equal to the product of the length and breadth. In the case of the circles, both the length and the breadth are equal. Therefore if r is length and r is the breadth of the circle that is why it is written as the square of the radius of the circle. The area of the circle is given by the following formula.

Area of the circle, A = π r² square units. The unit of the area is square units. It is represented by the capital letter ‘A’. We can also calculate other parameters of the circle, like the area of the sector, area of the segment of the circle.


Example: - Let us calculate the area of a circle which has the radius of seven meters. 

Solution: - given the radius of a circle is seven meters, therefore the area of the circle is 
A = π r²
A = π 7²
A = 22/7  × 7² = 154 square meters.

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