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Is merit pay for teachers best for students?

If you walk into a teacher's lounge, and your goal is to get the teachers really fired up...then ask them how they feel about merit pay! Teachers across the nation are torn in their beliefs when it comes to merit pay. For every teacher that supports merit pay, there is a teacher who firmly disagrees with merit pay. Educational reform would not be complete without some kind of overhaul in the way teachers are compensated. In the current form most teachers are paid based on their years of service and education, and in my opinion there are several flaws with this type of compensation setup. It would be easy to think the longer a teacher has taught, the more effective he/she is, however that is not always the case. Additionally, it would be easy to think the more education a teacher has, the more effective he/she is, and as before mentioned this is not always the case. Taking a small step back, I think the million dollar question should be, not how much should we pay teachers, but rather does compensation and pay always have to be in the form of money?


Research has continually shown that merit pay can have adverse effects on teacher and student achievement, rather than the expected increases in performance. When teachers are paid based on their individual performance it has been reported to negatively affect the relationships teachers have with each other. The collaborative nature that is essential to the efficiency and improvement of education is greatly reduced when teachers feel they are working for their own benefit, and not for the benefit of the team.


Perhaps the biggest concern with merit pay is the way teacher performance is determined. Should we use the results of one test per year to determine the overall effectiveness of a teacher, or should we use the grades of students for one teacher versus the grades of students from another teacher? The validity of merit pay is called into question because we are trying to make teacher performance into a black and white image, when as every educator knows, there is nothing black and white about education.


The elephant in the room can not be ignored. What really motivates and drives teachers? Money, fringe benefits, personal drivers, huge signing bonuses, lavish lifestyles and celebrity status? I think not, so then why is money and compensation such a big deal? Most teachers did not enter the teaching profession for money. We never thought being a teacher would put us on the same level as a professional athlete or a big name actor or actress. We were motivated and driven by the idea of impacting the lives of students. We wanted to inspire, motivate, encourage, teach, develop, mold, educate, guide, strengthen, create, stimulate, enhance, discover and influence the lives of our students in a positive and meaningful way.


Daniel Pink, wrote a fantastic book called Drive. This book outlines the basic principles that motivate humans. The basic principles were not celebrity status, they were not huge pay checks, they were not fancy cars and big houses, they were much simpler. Human nature requires autonomy, mastery and purpose to be motivated and driven. I am not saying merit pay is wrong, because there are states and districts using merit pay with increases in teacher and student performance. On the other hand, I am not saying merit pay is right, because there are also schools who have used merit pay and have seen a decrease in teacher and student performance. My main point is this: I urge educators to realize there is not a silver bullet to fixing and reforming education. There are many components to the educational process that need to evaluated simultaneously. There is only one part of education that is simple and straight forward...EVERY DECISION WE MAKE NEEDS TO BE IN THE BEST INTERESTS OF THE STUDENTS.


Please respond to this post with comments and feedback because I would really like to hear what people have to say about this topic. Thank you!

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Comment by Justin Tarte on August 2, 2010 at 8:24am
Frank - I totally agree. We should be encouraging a collaborative atmosphere that centers on working as a team. Cross-curricular curricula need to be the norm, not the exception. We should be concentrating on utilizing each others resources to have a positive and meaningful impact on our students.
Comment by Frank C. Vovk on August 1, 2010 at 7:48pm
Merit pay is wrong for the following reasons. 1) It presupposes that the teachers are not doing enough and need financial incentive to do their job well. 2) The carrot (money) is being used on people who have clearly stated that more time rather than more money is what they want - the message you are sending here is that you are not listening to them. 3) Educators of students from great families will naturally get merit pay while those teachers who work harder for their money (ie working with students who struggle) will get less - you are now setting up a class system in the school - which is great because teahers are never caddy!

A system that would work would treat teachers like the professionals they were trained to be. 1) Give every dept a secretary to do the paperwork 2) Let the teachers collaborate in a conference room with a) story boards b) a secretary c) a projector and d) laptops. Instead of listing off any other imporvements, just try to imagine what you would give a set of professionals in any other field to complete a project. As we used to say in the military crap in = crap out.
Comment by Patricia Chujman on July 31, 2010 at 1:14pm
Great article! I completely agree with the idea that we, teachers, alwasys work for the benefit of our students. We may complain about pay ( I think merit pay could work just for some people) but when we set down to work we do our best independently of the pay!

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