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One of the most important assignments all students should do is writing essays. The process of writing includes doing research, analyzing sources, outlining, composing, editing, proofreading, and getting a feedback. All in all, the process is time-consuming and labor-intensive, so most students are afraid of this assignment.

Unfortunately, sometimes students face problems of proper composing, formatting, and editing. No matter how good at writing you are, sometimes you might need a help or assistance, and you'd better read most precise writing service reviews here before placing a bid. Getting an insight is important as it helps you write papers faster and better.

While the variety of essay types is large, we want to focus on main rules on writing historical essays. Writing historical essays, you'd better take into account main rules to make an essay better and, therefore, get a higher mark.

Rule One: Review Lecture Notes

Every teacher provides students with lecture materials. If you make notes, that's great. It means you can review them at home and analyze the subject better. Pay attention to the facts you have written down as they might be useful while writing a historical essay.

Rule Two: Understand the Historical Question

To understand the historical event clearly, you need to analyze as many resources as possible. Thus, once you've reviewed lecture notes, read books or historical magazines, watch related videos, and find critics to completely understand the question.

Rule Three: Collect Reliable Data

A high-quality historical essay should be based on evidence and reliable data. Historical essay can't include assumptions. Thus, you need to analyze primary and secondary sources to get the most out of them. If you cite some historian, provide an information about the source.

Rule Four: Write Down an Outline

Before you start writing an essay, it's important to organize your thoughts, ideas, and data. Thus, you'd better write an outline to follow easy steps while creating the final draft. While writing down points to use later, you might want to cross out irrelevant information or add something new. Writing an outline is a way to get ready for finalizing your thoughts and composing an essay.


Rule Five: Polish a Strong Thesis Statement

Even if your essay is perfect is terms of its structure, formatting, and spelling, it can't be a good one without a strong thesis statement. A thesis statement tells readers what to expect and disclose your attitude toward a problem. However, to create a strong thesis statement, you need to find controversial evidence to compare and contrast them.


Rule Six: Include Cite Sources

Writing a historical essay, you analyze articles, books, and other material to be impersonal, thoughtful, and reliable. Academic writing should include a reference page where you include all sources you've used while preparing the final draft. Depending on the format style, there are different guidelines on citing, so explore more before create a work cited page.


Rule Seven: Double-Check Dates

The history is based on dates, and that's logical. While writing a historical essay, you need to cite some events and writing dates is a must. However, sometimes students make mistakes, and it's crucial to double-check dates in order not to weaken your essay.


Rule Eight: Craft a Good Presentation if Needed

If you need to present your essay to the crowd, craft a good presentation. People perceive visual information better, so include some pictures or short videos to support your point of view. Plus, to enhance readability, divide the text into chunks, use bullet lists, and write 1-sentence summaries.

Historical writing differs from other types of writing, as it has a direct correlation between time and place. Thus, next time you need to write a historical essay, pay attention to the above-mentioned rules. The more you prepare for writing, the better it is. 

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