The Educator's PLN

The personal learning network for educators

Use these two words and become a better student

Words are powerful.

And you do not only know that since your last exam. A single word can change everything: it can make you the victor, save relationships, calm you down or pull you into the abyss.

Finding the right words is an art that not everyone masters. Some use their words inflationary and put one empty phrase to the next. Others put every word on the gold scale and interpret everything possible into what is said.

But your choice of words not only affects how other people perceive you. Your words and thoughts can greatly influence your own behavior and make you a better student.

As subtle as it sounds, you can control yourself with your own words. How this works, Customwriting.com show you in this article.

How to turn your choice into a better student


Recently, I came across the book by Bernard Roth, "The Achievement Habit," in which the Stanford professor explains how habits work and how our brains sometimes get in the way of achieving good intentions.

The author even goes one step further and describes how our brains sabotage the best intentions and subconsciously mislead us. Luckily, it also shows what you can do about it: One of the simplest and most effective ways to outsmart the brain is to adapt your own choice of words.

By choosing the words and thought patterns, one's own behavior can be reprogrammed and influenced in such a way that we reach our goals faster and happier.

Here are two examples that you can implement immediately:

1. Replace "must" with "want"!
Many students tend to view all tasks and challenges as mandatory commitments. They "have to go to the lecture and they have to" learn "after that. They forget that they have chosen their own studies and voluntarily do what they are doing right now.

Of course, studying brings certain responsibilities and it is also quite normal that a successful degree requires hard work. Nevertheless, you have the binding nature of your tasks in your own hands. And that thought can fundamentally change your motivation.

Therefore, do the following adjustment of your thoughts:

Replace "must" with "want"!

Every time you think, "I still have to do this and that today." Change your thought pattern to "I want to do this and that today." This approach will make you realize that your tasks are exactly what you have chosen for you - even though it may seem annoying and exhausting at first glance.

Examples:

  • You want to go to the lecture today.
  • You still want to learn after that.
  • You want to create your studies.
     

2. Use "and" instead of "but"!
Is your brain also particularly good at finding excuses for you? If so, then it probably very often uses a small, innocent "but." Many students would like to learn more, "but" they just do not have enough time. They would rather start with the student work, "but" they do not feel like it.

The word "but" between two sentences creates an inner conflict that does not really exist. By constellations as above, the first part of the sentence is weakened and devalued: You would do it, "but" it's just not possible because ... By using the word "and", your brain will be stimulated to both sentence contents connect and look for a solution, how to get both under one hat.

Therefore, do the following adjustment of your thoughts:

Use "and" instead of "but"!

Instead of thinking about why you can not do something and justify what that is, you start using "and" and perceive your thought patterns differently: Instead of "I want to learn today, but I have too little time. "Are you going to say," I still want to learn today and I do not have much time. " You still do not have much time - but what speaks against starting learning anyway and at least having a small 10-minute session at your desk? Right: nothing more.

Examples:

  • I want to write my thesis and I do not feel like it.
    (Can you start anyway, even though you do not feel like it?)
  • I want to meet my friends and I have to work.
    (Can you meet your friends after work or shorten the meeting to make it fit?)
  • I want to ask the lecturers something and I do not dare.
    (Is it possible for you to grow beyond yourself and ask the lecturer despite your shyness?)

Conclusion


You are not helpless at the mercy of your thoughts, but you can consciously shape and control them until they positively influence your behavior. To do that, in the first step, you find limiting thought patterns in yourself and then implement them with new, positive structures.

This allows you to gradually reorient your automatic thinking and break up deadlocked patterns. As a reward, you get a different perspective and can find new ways to solve your daily tasks. In addition, problems often no longer seem as insoluble as they originally appeared to you.

Problems and blockages are usually a matter of the mind. And sometimes just two small words are enough to clear your head.

Views: 111

Comment

You need to be a member of The Educator's PLN to add comments!

Join The Educator's PLN

About

Thomas Whitby created this Ning Network.

Latest Activity

Marguerite T. Brode posted a blog post

How to choose profession?

At some point or another, each individual needs to pick or change profession. In youth it is anything but easy to be mixed up, and the committed error can be uneasy to remedy. Above all else, it merits figuring out what put in life you dole out proficient action right now and how this circumstance can change throughout the years. In current conditions there isn’t just an enormous selection of claims to fame.The basics of choosing profession are laid back at school, when the exercises uncover…See More
2 hours ago
Jeffrey R. Ellis posted a blog post

How employment is related to your coursework examples

When fresh out of college, chances are you have little to no work experience, which means your resume may look incomplete to some extent. To make it worse, questions like "what is your past work experience?" seems to be a common pertinent step in all job interviews. Although you may have…See More
Tuesday
Louise Grady updated their profile
Monday
Shanshan Ma posted a discussion

Personalized learning network and social media

Hi All, My name is Shanshan Ma, I'm currently a doctoral student at University of North Texas. Nice to meet you all. This platform looks great, many future events could be found. Thanks for sharing. But a questions crossed my mind, how would you see the impact of social media such as Facebook, Twitter on those personal learning networks? Would you believe that members would actively participant in some discussions on social media other than the discussions here??See More
Monday
Shanshan Ma liked Ruth Herman Wells's event Portland, OR: Strategies to Teach and Counsel Troubled and Struggling Youth
Monday
Lisa Wayne updated their profile
Saturday
Dennis Dunn updated their profile
Sep 14
Profile IconSveinung Skaalnes, Elizabeth Collins, Argentina A Amores and 10 more joined The Educator's PLN
Sep 14

Awards And Nominations

© 2018   Created by Thomas Whitby.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service